On September 27, 1989, Peter DeBernardi of Niagara Falls, Ontario and Geoffrey Petkovich of Ottawa, Ontario became the first people to go over the Canadian Horseshoe Falls (intentionally in the same barrel) and live. They were positioned head to head in a ten-foot barrel. The steel barrel was then launched into the Niagara River from the back of a truck approximately 150 metres (492 feet) above the Canadian Horseshoe Falls.

Once over the Falls it crested and floated for several minutes close to the shoreline before members of his recovery team on the Canadian side of the border managed to snaggle the barrel with a grappling hook. When the hatch was opened both men appeared okay with the exception of a few minor injuries. Climbing the bank to Table Rock Scenic Tunnels, now called Journey Behind the Falls, and after refusing medical attention, they were taken to Niagara Parks Police Headquarters where they were charged with infractions under the Niagara Parks Act.

In November of the same yearm, DeBernardi was fined $1,000 for trespassing in a prohibited area and $500 for performing without permission, a stunt in the river and gorge - a violation of the Niagara Parks Act. Earlier in the year, Petkovich was fined $500 under the same act.

Sixteen daredevils have gone over the Falls, starting with 63-year-old Annie Taylor, who o went over the falls in a large oak barrel on October 24th, 1901. Two of these 16 daredevils went over the Falls twice, two others went over together in the same barrel, six of the sixteen daredevils lost their lives and 15 of them went over the Canadian Horseshoe Falls.

The last daredevil, 54-year-old, Kirk Jones, lost his life on June 16, 2017 when he went over the American Falls in an inflatable large rubber ball. Most likely, he was thrown from the barrel on impact. His crushed body was found on June 22, 19 kilometres (12 miles) downriver at Lewiston N.Y.  He was the only daredevil who attempted this stunt by going over the American Falls. The base of this falls is covered with large treacherous boulders.

History
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